SEARCH

Loading...

Subscribe

RSS Feed

Sub by Email

Twitter Me

INTERVIEWS

Peter Higgins, author of Wolfhound Century

Myke Cole, author of Shadow Ops Series

John Brown John, translator of the Zamonia Novels

Jim C. Hines author of Libriomancer

Nick Harkaway author of Angelmaker (review here)

Martha Wells author of The Cloud Roads

David Tallerman author of Giant Thief

Mazarkis Williams author of The Emperor's Knife

Rob Ziegler author of Seed

Steven Gould author of 7th Sigma

Douglas Hulick author of Among Thieves (review here)

Mark Charan Newton author of Nights of Villjamur (review here)

Kameron Hurley author of God's War (review here)

Brent Weeks author of The Black Prism (review here)

Anthony Huso author of The Last Page (review here)

Brandon Sanderson author of The Way of Kings (review here)

Lou Anders Editor of Pyr Books

Ian Tregillis author of Bitter Seeds (review here)

Sam Sykes author of Tome of the Undergates (review here)

Benjamin Parzybok author of Couch (review here)

Kristine Kathryn Rusch author of Diving Into the Wreck (review here)

Ken Scholes author of Lamentation

Cherie Priest author of Boneshaker (review here)

Lev Grossman author of The Magicians (review here)

Character Interviews

Alexia and Lord Maccon from Gail Carriger's Soulless

Lord Akeldama from Gail Carriger's Soulless

Eva Forge from Tim Akers's The Horns of Ruin

Atticus from Kevin Hearne's Hounded

RECENT REVIEWS

The Daylight War by Peter V. Brett

A Memory of Light by Robert Jordan & Brandon Sanderson

Scoundrels by Timothy Zahn

Cold Days by Jim Butcher

Year Zero by Rob Reid

Alif: The Unseen by G. Willow Wilson

Scourge of the Betrayer by Jeff Salyards

Redshirts by John Scalzi

Control Point by Myke Cole

Angelmaker by Nick Harkaway
My BlogCatalog BlogRank Wikio - Top Blogs - Literature

(New) Cover Unveiled for Amped by Daniel H. Wilson


Last year a different cover was released for Wilson's next novel Amped, which focused more on the neuron's firing aspect from the story as a design element. I'm guessing that version didn't standout as well as some people would have liked so we've got this bold number mimicking the power button on computers. I like it but this is overly derivative of the design for Mira Grant's Newflesh trilogy. This doesn't change the fact that I'm still looking forward to Amped and this is in addition to the overly sales-y copy:
Technology makes them superhuman. But mere mortals want them kept in their place. The New York Times bestselling author of Robopocalypse creates a stunning, near-future world where technology and humanity clash in surprising ways. The result? The perfect summer blockbuster.

As he did in Robopocalypse, Daniel Wilson masterfully envisions a frightening near-future world. In Amped, people are implanted with a device that makes them capable of superhuman feats. The powerful technology has profound consequences for society, and soon a set of laws is passed that restricts the abilities—and rights—of "amplified" humans. On the day that the Supreme Court passes the first of these laws, twenty-nine-year-old Owen Gray joins the ranks of a new persecuted underclass known as "amps." Owen is forced to go on the run, desperate to reach an outpost in Oklahoma where, it is rumored, a group of the most enhanced amps may be about to change the world—or destroy it.

Once again, Daniel H. Wilson's background as a scientist serves him well in this technologically savvy thriller that delivers first-rate entertainment, as Wilson takes the "what if" question in entirely unexpected directions. Fans of Robopocalypse are sure to be delighted, and legions of new fans will want to get "amped" this summer.
Wilson doing super-powered humans just has to be a good fit. Doesn't it? Come June we'll all get a chance to find out.

You Might Also Like:
REVIEW | Robopocalypse by Daniel H. Wilson
REVIEW | Machine Man by Max Barry
REVIEW | Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
REVIEW | How to Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe by Charles Yu
GROUP THINK | What is one device from a Science Fiction novel (or film) you wish were real?

1 comments:

Italia said...

Humans have solved some brain related issues. They have placed electronic devices in their heads to fix problems like epilepsy, autism, poor site, poor hearing, etc. But, people can also have devices implanted to make themselves better. These people are called "amps". Now the country is concerned, do they have an unfair over ordinary humans. Fear of this causes discrimination and new laws. The story follows one man who has such a device and runs into the discrimination. One other problem for him, apparently his device is not like all the rest. Are people after him because of this? And, what should he do with this different device.